Caucasus

+ Antique / Caucasus


Sumakh

+ Antique / Caucasus


Kazak

+ Antique / Caucasus


Shirvan

+ Antique / Caucasus


Shirvan

+ Antique / Caucasus


Suzani

+ Antique / Caucasus


Suzani

+ Antique / Caucasus


Suzani

+ Antique / Caucasus


Suzani

+ Antique / Caucasus


Suzani

+ Antique / Caucasus


Kilim Kuba

+ Antique / Caucasus


Kilim Karabagh

+ Antique / Caucasus


Kilim Azarbaydian

Historical informationHistorical information

The mountainous Caucasus region presents a ‘mix’ of ethnic groups, peoples, cultures and religions that clash frequently with one another. Here we find Kurds, Azeri Turks, Armenians, Shahasava nomads, Chechens and Tats (also known as Mountain Jews). One feature they all share is their skill in carpet weaving.

 

Many currents, and likewise many styles, converge into the Caucasian tradition, with the major influences being Russian and Persian, and the end result is a highly original blend of geometric and abstract simplicity and a wealth of decoration and colour. In the world of rugs, the hallmark of the Caucasian approach is refinement and graphic and decorative talent, the roots of which run deep within the identity of the ancient, mysterious villages of this land.  

 

The most widespread pattern elements are composed of polygonal medallions of various sizes, to which numerous plant motifs are added. The edging is usually made up of a main border alongside which we find two smaller borders separated by thin strips formed by alternating quadrilaterals in two colours: white/red, white/black etc.)  

The colours of Caucasian carpets are particularly bright and lively. This is especially evident in the carpets of the mountain areas, given the shininess of the wool and the variety of matching creative colour schemes, a typical feature found throughout the eastern Caucasus.

 

Caucasian carpets, termed Giaba, are generally small (ranging from approx. 90x150 to 120x180 cm). Long formats are less common. The small paired travelling bags called khurdzihin or the single mafrash bags (for which the Sumakh technique is adopted) are rare.

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