Anatolia

+ Antique / Anatolia


Ushak

+ Antique / Anatolia


Sivas

+ Antique / Anatolia


Ushak

+ Antique / Anatolia


Fethiye

+ Antique / Anatolia


Bergama

+ Antique / Anatolia


Tulu

+ Antique / Anatolia


Tulu

+ Antique / Anatolia


Tulu

+ Antique / Anatolia


Kilim Malatya

+ Antique / Anatolia


Karakecili

+ Antique / Anatolia


+ Antique / Anatolia


Kilim Shivrishar

+ Antique / Anatolia


Kilim Shivrishar

Historical informationHistorical information

Anatolia, which is part of Turkey, is divided by experts into three production areas: south-western, central and eastern Anatolia. Extremely refined rugs are produced in these areas, with top-quality knotting, reflecting a tradition that goes back many centuries. Indeed, in 1271, Marco Polo, aware of the extraordinary skill of Turkish knotters, wrote, “Here, the finest and most beautiful rugs in the world are made”.

 

Anatolian works are noteworthy above all for their great variety of colour. Not only are many colours used; these shades are enhanced by the uniquely rounded shape of the wool and are usually full and bright, while at the same time warm and soft. Generally speaking, especially evident is the presence of many colours very rarely found in the works produced in other areas, such as yellow, green, violet and orange. White rarely appears as a dominant colour, and is generally used to accentuate contrasts and amalgamate the backgrounds of other colours.

 

With the exception of certain works from Herekè, all Anatolian carpets feature the symmetrical knotting known as Turkish or Ghiordes. Rugs were a vitally important feature not only in noble palaces or mosques, but also of the clay or brick houses of the country folk, as well as the tents of tribesmen. In the latter case, carpets were practically the only décor to be found.  

 

The most common format is the so-called prayer rug size (approx. 120x210 cm). The smaller namazlik rugs (approx. 60x120cm) or the extravagant yastik (50/60x80/100 cm) are rarer. The term yastik means cushion, and this was the use they were designed for.

We then have runners, or makatlik. Lastly, we should mention the large, generally long, rugs (200/400x400/800 cm) called khali. Khali are generally found in palaces (adorning the spaces surrounded on three sides by seating), or in mosques.

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